Describe in Five: Cam Robinson

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One of the guys who may have some news and highlights around him is the offensive tackle from Alabama, Cam Robinson. Robinson was in some legal troubles that made people doubt his round 1 pedigree, but it is clear that he is one of the best offensive tackles in the class. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. While you can see who we’ve already discussed here, it’s time to look at the offensive line, starting with Robinson.

5. vs. Texas A&M (2016)

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This is the best example of Robinson’s ability in college. He faced off against the consensus #1 prospect in this year’s draft in Texas A&M rusher Myles Garrett, and for the most part, he had a good game. On this play, he is able to easily set his base while Garrett starts his wrap-around speed rush. Robinson is able to shut him down before he can get outside, and he keeps him in place while the rest of the pocket stays clean for quarterback Jalen Hurts. The pass was incomplete, but it shows Robinson’s ability to shut down strong rushers. He is even able to stop the counter move from Garrett when he tries to push inside. Robinson is even able to stop him so well that the rusher disengages and sets up to make another run before the pass. Robinson is a strong pass blocker, and it is clearly on display here and for most of this game.

4. vs. LSU (2015)

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Run blocking is half the battle as an offensive lineman, and Cam Robinson is a solid one. Here he ends up blocking edge rusher Arden Key, who is part of a 5-2 formation. This play clearly shows Robinson’s ability to keep his legs driving and how he can latch onto a defender that he is blocking. Leg drive shows his lower body strength that is so vital for a lineman, and his strength to not allow his defender to disengage is very important. This is solid blocking that any running back would like to have. The rest of the line may not be doing the same, but Robinson is clearly doing his job on this play.

3. vs. Tennessee (2016)

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This is a play that highlights a clear problem with Robinson’s kick slide, which turns into doubting his pass protection. The good part about his short, choppy slide is that it allows him to keep a strong base and take rushers head on. Here it becomes a problem when he’s facing an edge rusher who sticks to using his speed alone to win. Tennessee defensive end Derek Barnett is able to burst off the line and bend under Robinson, who is getting beat laterally. Robinson ends up reaching for Barnett, who sneaks past him and is able to get a fumble-sack on Alabama’s freshman quarterback Jalen Hurts. When Robinson is using his choppy steps to set his base, a quick edge rusher is able to speed off the line and beat him, which leads Robinson to miss on his block and allow his quarterback to get hit. There are some clear pros and cons when it comes to Robinson’s kick slide, but this displays a clear con.

2. vs. Mississippi State (2015)

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This play is able to show Robinson’s ability to get to the second level of the defense. Offensive linemen being able to move forward quickly is important, especially on a run play. Here he gets past the defensive end who is collapsing on the weakside run, and moves up to the MIKE linebacker. While he misses the block, the burst is shown on the play, and that’s what matters most. The projection is the most important part of evaluation, and it’s clear that Robinson could do this in the NFL. He is a slightly above average run blocker, and his quickness will help him in the future. While some may believe this is a skill that mostly guards need, it is beneficial if you have five offensive linemen that can move well, and it can add a new element to the running game. Robinson could be one of those five players.

1. vs. Western Kentucky (2016)

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Lateral movement is important for offensive linemen, and while it’s not vital to a team’s offense, it can help coordinators run certain plays and increase the chance of success for some offenses. Robinson shows off his quickness here on a screen play. While receiver Calvin Ridley doesn’t use his block, Robinson paves over a defensive back crashing on the play. If the other blockers were able to do their job, a decent hole near the sideline would have been open for Ridley. This is a good example of the tackle’s ability to make blocks on the move, as well as his ability to actually get to the spot. Offensive line coaches will like his quickness and strength on the move, and it can add portions to the offense that teams with less athletic tackles can’t run.

In Conclusion

Cam Robinson may be the best offensive tackle in this class, and he is a good candidate to start on the blind side for a team in 2017. He has good talent, solid techniques, and decent athleticism for a position that doesn’t often require it. While there are some mechanics, like his kick slide, that some teams might not like, there are certainly teams that value his skillset and would like to draft him early on. He should be a Day 1 pick in the draft, and a Day 1 starter in the NFL for the right team.

Describe in Five: Jamal Adams

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One of the guys who may have some news and highlights around him is former LSU safety Jamal Adams. Adams enjoyed a breakout year in 2016 where he showed his skillset that makes him arguably the most talented safety in the draft. While others may be better in one area or another, Adams has the best all-around talent of all. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. While you can see who we’ve already discussed here, we are going to focus our attention on the former Tiger, Adams.

5. vs. Alabama (2016)

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This play is able to show off Adams’ zone coverage ability. He reads Aabama quarterback Jalen Hurts’ eyes to understand where he wants to go with the ball, and gets himself into position to make a play where receiver ArDarius Stewart should be. While Hurts may have been targeting the underneath receiver, he overthrows his man and Adams is able to make a play on the ball during Alabama’s first offensive possession. The LSU safety’s ability to play in zone is a major part of the game as a safety, and Adams clearly has this talent.

4. vs. Texas A&M (2016)

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This play helps show off Adams’ play recognition and burst to get to the ball. As soon as the ball is snapped and he sees the two outside receivers blocking, he knows this is a screen pass. His man is the receiver, so he attacks the ball before it is thrown, and shows up in time to stop the target behind the line of scrimmage for a loss of a yard or two. This is exactly what you want to see from a defensive back in man coverage, and it is a great example of Adams’ “football IQ”.  He is also able to make a secure low tackle, which he hasn’t always shown the ability to do. Sniffing out plays before they happen is a special talent in the NFL, and when a young player like Adams can do it, it is a great indicator for his success at the next level, as long as he continues to be correct.

3. vs. Wisconsin (2016)

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One of Jamal Adams’ greatest skills is his ability to sniff out ball carriers, and it especially shows in his run defense. While he isn’t making the tackle on Wisconsin back Corey Clement, you can see him “sift through trash” and make his way to the ball carrier, and he is the only defender not on the play-side to get to the ball. Being able to sift through trash and flow to the play is an ability that linebackers and defensive backs should be able to showcase in the run game, and here Adams does it well. His talent at finding the ball carrier is special, and it helps add to his case in the hopes of him getting selected early on in the draft.

2. vs. Florida (2016)

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While Adams is a hard hitter that is considered strong for his position, there are times where it does not show. This also shows his poor tackling technique at times. Florida’s running back, Jordan Scarlett, is a decent power runner, but Adams should be able to bring him down here. He attacks the ball carrier too high, and instead of going for a low, secure tackle, keeps trying to bring him down up high as he is carried for an extra 10 yards. This is an issue that some players show in college, where they go for the highlight play like stripping the ball or laying the wood on a ball carrier, and instead are made to look foolish. Here Adams is the victim, but this won’t always happen to him.

1. vs. Texas Tech (2015 Texas Bowl)

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Adams again shows off his great ability to attack ball carriers and read plays early. It’s also a play that shows off his skillset against another highly regarded talent in this year’s draft, Texas Tech quarterback Pat Mahomes. Here the Red Raiders are running a screen pass, and Adams sees the delay from the back and the offensive lineman break away from the strong side. Adams reads this and makes a break for the running back as soon as Mahomes turns to face the play. As the back starts to come down with the ball, Adams is there to lay a hard hit on him, making him drop the ball and possibly force a fumble. The mental side of football is more than half the battle, and Adams’ mental capacity when it comes to the passing game is incredibly important. He is a special player here, and he should be able to continue this trend into his NFL game.

In Conclusion

Jamal Adams is well deserving of being given the title of the best safety in the 2017 NFL Draft. He hows the ability to play the passing game both in man and zone, and he is a great run defender. His hard hits add even more value to his game, as well as his special teams ability (he played as a gunner for the punt team at LSU). While he could use some work on his tackling ability, Adams is a special talent at a position that doesn’t have as much value as others. While convention may say that drafting a safety in the top 10 of the draft is a bad idea, if a team is going to do it, they should choose Jamal Adams.

Describe in Five: Marshon Lattimore

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One of the guys who may have some news and highlights around him is former Ohio State cornerback Marshon Lattimore. Lattimore starred in his one season starting, and he just may be the best corner in a draft class full of legitimate starting talent. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. While you can see who we’ve already discussed here, now we shift to the defensive side and take a look at things with Lattimore.

5. vs. Oklahoma (2016)

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This is one of the plays that makes Lattimore so special. He is able to bait the quarterback, Baker Mayfield, into throwing to his receiver because it appears that Lattimore is lagging behind. Once the ball is thrown, he uses his catch up speed to get in front of the pass and return it for 10 or 15 yards. “Baiting” the quarterback is a move that faster and smarter cornerbacks can use, and in an era where teams are passing 30-35 times a game, it is a great trick to keep in the back pocket. Lattimore’s incredible athleticism helps him do this, and he made a very good read on the play when making it.

4. vs. Oklahoma (2016)

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Another impressive play from the same game here for Lattimore. He frequently played “bail” coverage in this game, where instead of facing the receiver, the cornerback turns and runs to cover vertical routes. On this play, he does a very good job of staying on top of the receiver so as to disrupt the route. The quarterback still tries to throw the pass with the expectation that the receiver will fight for it, but Lattimore is able to catch up to the ball and make a great interception late in the game. Man coverage skills like these, especially in different techniques, are great to have, and many teams will be looking for a cover corner with Lattimore’s skills.

3. vs. Wisconsin (2016)

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One area of play on defense that many people fail to look into with cornerbacks is run defense. Tackling and being able to play the run is an extremely important thing for every player on defense, and Lattimore shows that he has that ability. Here he is able to sniff out of the running back and sort of flow down to the play and make a strong tackle. Corey Clement is a very good running back with decent strength, but Lattimore is able to wrap up his lower body and bring him down, which is very sound technique for a member of the secondary. Stopping the run is half the battle on defense, and with Lattimore, you have a corner that can help you with that.

2. vs. Michigan (2016)

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Here is one area that Lattimore will need to work on in the pros: route recognition. Here he is playing with the bail technique again, this time against Michigan receiver Amara Darboh. Lattimore reads the play as a vertical route, but Darboh is able to make it into a sort of hitch route where he can sit below a linebacker in zone coverage and beat out Lattimore. He is lost on the play, and this is a common thing in the NFL. Cornerbacks need to be able to recognize the route their receiver is running, and Lattimore missed out here. Plays like these get easier with more work in practice, so it will likely be something that is smoothed over in time.

1. vs. Nebraska (2016)

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Ball skills are what people care about the most with players in the defensive secondary, and Lattimore definitely has them. He had 4 interceptions and 11 passes defensed in his one year as a starter. This play accurately shows what he can do. While he is being beaten vertically, Lattimore is able to catch up and make a diving pass break up on a big play. If he misses this, it is easily a touchdown for the Huskers. He does well to keep up the hand fighting as the ball is coming down, and he times his reach perfectly with the receiver jumping and coming down with the ball. This is exactly how you want to see this ball played, and it is an important trait to have for cornerbacks.

In Conclusion

Marshon Lattimore was a great one-year wonder for the Buckeyes, and he showed in that one season that he has traits that translate well to being a top cover corner in the NFL. He showed great ball skills, solid coverage techniques, and good skills in the run game and tackling. While it may take him some time to the adjust to the NFL game and play style, he could likely be a #1 shutdown corner for a team picking in the top of the first round of this draft. If a team in the top 10 picks is in need of a new #1 (like the Jets after losing Darrelle Revis), they would be smart to choose him, where they get a great starting defensive piece from Day 1 on.

 

Describe in Five: Corey Davis

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One of the guys who may have some news and highlights around him is Western Michigan’s Corey Davis. A lower-level FBS star for a few years with the Broncos, Davis is going to be a premium pick at the wide receiver position with his skill set. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. While you can see who we’ve already discussed here, we are moving on to one of the top wide receivers in the class with Davis.

1. vs. Wisconsin (2017 Cotton Bowl)

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After an undefeated season playing smaller schools, Western Michigan was able to get a Cotton Bowl bid against Wisconsin. While the Badgers were much tougher than the rest of the Broncos’ opponents, Davis was still able to make this impressive touchdown catch that could’ve been important to a WMU comeback. After his initial route fails and quarterback Zach Terrell needs to find another man, Davis makes a break towards the opposite end of the end zone and is able to reach over the man in coverage to make the catch. This is impressive tracking and catch in traffic skills puts into use. It also shows that Davis understands the hole in the coverage after the play breaks down. This is an important trait, especially when playing against better defenses in the NFL.

2. vs. Eastern Michigan (2016)

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Here we see an area that is one of Davis’ strengths, and one that is a weakness of his. The strength is his run after the catch (RAC) ability. He is able to catch  the ball while being hit, and also able to spin off the defender and try to work for more yards before being tackled by more than half the defense. His RAC ability was one of the best in college football last year, and with his size it’s a great thing to have. The area in which he has some struggles is his route running. The Broncos are running a sort of levels concept in which in routes are run at different levels to make the safety bite on one. Davis sort of rounds out his route instead of making a hard cut which can help shake the defender. The man in coverage is able to easily follow with him while playing off coverage, and joins in on the tackle. The cut in a route is one of the most important parts of it, and one aspect that Davis could use work on.

3. vs. Ball State

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This is another area in which Davis struggles at times, but is not always shown: “focus drops.” This is a catch that if made would likely be a home run. While a bit underthrown, there is not enough coverage on Davis that warrants a drop, and he should be able to bring this in and possibly get the touchdown. Davis’ separation is great, especially on deep routes, but he needs to work on finishing the play and bringing balls like this one in.

4. vs. Ball State (2016)

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A few plays later, Davis goes and does this. His ability to make contested catches is almost unmatched in this class, and he shows it off well here, reaching over a cornerback to snag a 55 yard touchdown pass. A receiver that has a catch radius and ability like Davis is able to mask mistakes made by quarterbacks at times, and he would be a great benefactor for any offense. Davis’ leaping ability is also shown here, and it adds a great aspect to his game when he can reach balls that smaller defenders can’t.

5. vs. Toledo (2016)

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This is one of my personal favorites while watching Davis. His red zone ability is great, and he plays big here. Davis tosses the defender aside while he fakes a fade route, then breaks back to the ball and keeps both feet in bounds while he comes down with it. This play was run in a similar fashion by a certain All-Pro tight end for the Patriots in 2015. It’s what you look for in a big wide receiver in the red zone, and Davis is one of the best there. Bigger receivers need to be able to use their size to their advantage, and there’s two ways of doing that; you can either beat them in the air on a jump ball, or beat them on the ground with physicality. Davis chooses the latter, and it works well for him and the quarterback Terrell here.

In Conclusion

Corey Davis seemed to have a few issues against top competition, but his all around skill set as a wide receiver gives me no pause in his ability to translate to the league. He will likely be a top 15 pick in this year’s draft, and he will likely have a strong career full of 1,000+ yard seasons. Davis needs to work on limiting focus drops and improve the refinement of his route running, but these are common problems that virtually every wide receiver is able to fix when they come to the NFL. His run after the catch ability, especially while being 6-3, is unmatched by the other big bodied receivers in this class, and will be a crucial part to his game at the next level. There is no doubt that Davis will be a great player in the NFL.

Describe in Five: Leonard Fournette

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One player that may be mentioned in the conversations is Leonard Fournette, who is the top running back in this year’s draft. Fournette was a star for LSU’s run-first offense since his freshman year, and he has succeeded for three straight years and will now head to the NFL to be a great player. There are virtually zero scenarios in which Fournette is not picked within the top 10 of the draft. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. After talking about Deshaun Watson yesterday, we can move on to someone who is considered the best running back in Fournette.

1. vs. Alabama (2016)

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This is a solid example of Fournette’s balance and running ability. Alabama’s defense beat up on the Tigers’ offensive line all night long, and general held the running back to a small amount of yardage. On this play he’s able to pick up just about 9 yards and show off his short jump cuts, vision, and ability to stay on his feet when a defender comes in contact with him. This game was full of bad plays from the offensive line and at times, Fournette himself, but there were points in the game that showcased his abilities and why he is considered such a good running back.

2. vs. Wisconsin (2016)

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In the season opener for the Tigers, Wisconsin’s defense was able to key in Fournette’s run for most of the game.There were points at which he was able to break off some big runs, though, like the one shown above. This play shows Fournette’s vision when reading blocks and running lanes, and his ability to move to the open lane as fast as possible and get outside. After a slow start when the Badgers’ defense was on to him, Fournette was able to collect six yards a carry and finished with almost 140 yards. This is a good example of him being able to make some yards for himself.

3. vs. Mississippi State (2016)

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This shows a time where Fournette misses a chance to create a couple yards for himself and settles for getting stopped just after the line of scrimmage. He tries to lower his shoulder to beat the safety coming down, but the SAM linebacker is able to read the run and help secure the tackle. Fournette has the opportunity to make a cut outside, where there is just a cornerback waiting for him with a receiver able to offer blocking. This is an issue that could possibly be fixed, but vision issues have plagued top running backs before (hey, Trent Richardson).

4. vs. Mississippi State (2016)

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People looking at the stat sheet for Fournette’s game vs. Miss State would probably be impressed: he rushed for 147 yards and 2 touchdowns. What they won’t see is that he also lost the ball twice, and one came on a fourth down play that could’ve been important to the game. This is ball security that you don’t want to see. A running back should be able to hold onto the ball through a rip, especially when he already has two hands on. In 2016, Fournette fumbled 3 times on 129 carries. That turns out to be an average of one fumble every 43 carries. If Fournette ends up being your primary back, that means that he’s going to fumble once every game or two, which is not ideal with a “star” back.

5. vs. Ole Miss (2016)

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This was an interesting play that shows a few things. First, Fournette is lined up as the offset fullback on this play, and he runs a flare to the flat to catch a pass. Fournette is normally targeted about 2 or 3 times a game as a receiver, so it was good to see him catch the ball and make it work after the catch. The play also shows Fournette’s ability to turn his speed into power, when he crushes a defensive back that tries to tackle low on him. While the DB was using the correct technique, Fournette’s ability to lower himself to that level and deliver a blow like this is impressive. Power backs are important in the NFL, and Fournette has that sort of element to his game while keeping speed in as an option as well.

In Conclusion

Leonard Fournette has been called a generational talent since stepping into Death Valley. I do not believe he is one of those that will be considered an all-time great, but I believe that Fournette will be very successful in his career and end up a Hall of Fame candidate. He is a strong runner and is able to create for himself when he can lower his shoulder on smaller targets. Fournette spends too much time dancing in the backfield at times, and that will lead to issues if he does not have a strong offensive line playing in front of him. He also needs to improve a bit on his ball security, as it could end up being a problem like former LSU back Stevan Ridley. If he has a group of road graders that can create holes for him, he will have an Ezekiel Elliott-type rookie year. If he goes to a team like the New York Jets that is rebuilding their offensive line, he will need time to develop his creation skills. For now he is a great talent that needs to be put in the right place to succeed in the NFL.

Describe in Five: Deshaun Watson

Now that the NFL Draft Combine has wrapped up, we now have the fullest view we can get of most of the draft’s prospects. This allows us to finalize rankings, or our so called “big boards,” and determine who us experts have ranked in order based on talent. There are plenty of talented prospects across all possible rounds of the draft, and there will surely be steals and busts labeled everywhere. Players will be knocked for random things, and we’ll hear plenty from “an anonymous scout” until the Draft rolls around in late April. One player that a lot of these topics will surround is Deshaun Watson, who is arguably the best quarterback in the draft. The former Clemson Tiger capped off his college career with a comeback win in the College Football Playoff Championship, and he will likely be QB1 and a top 10 pick. The goal of Describe in Five is to try to get the best picture of a prospect in just five .gifs, with an explanation behind each one. What better place to start than with the best quarterback in the draft?

1. vs. Alabama (CFP Champ., 2016)

 

This play shows Watson’s ability to understand coverages, and it came during one of the most important plays of the Championship Game. On third down, and just out of field goal range, Watson sends receiver Hunter Renfrow across the formation. Since Alabama’s cornerback (#2) follows him, Watson knows this is man coverage, with a good amount of space between the two.

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The cornerback gives Renfrow a solid 7 or 8 yard cushion, which Watson takes advantage of to throw a quick slant pass to give Clemson an important first down and put them into better field goal range.

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2. vs. Ohio State (CFP)

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People have been knocking Watson for his low velocity score at the Combine, but when you watch his play it certainly isn’t noticeable. If he really is throwing the ball slow, he makes up for it with great anticipation, timing, and ball placement. He is able to keep the ball away from defenders like he does, threading a pass between a linebacker and cornerback to Hunter Renfrow for a first down.

3. vs. Florida State

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One thing Deshaun Watson deserves credit for that he doesn’t often get is his toughness. His offensive line played poorly in 2016, and he had to take plenty of hits that many other signal callers around him weren’t faced with. In this play he shows off his ability to stand tall and take a hit while making a throw. One play after a missed facemask penalty by DeMarcus Christmas sacked him, Watson shifts out of the collapsing pocket, plants, and makes a throw to Renfrow for a near first down in the fourth quarter.

4. vs. Auburn

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Plays like these are where the velocity problems will show up with Watson. Outside screen and swing passes are often going to be led by wide receivers blocking, and they cannot be expected to hold their blocks for more than a few seconds. The premise is to create a hole for the screen receiver to be able to get around those defenders and get to the open field. When the ball takes too long to get to the receiver, the blocks will be lost and the receiver is not going to get where he needs to go (in this case, the first down marker). While Mike Williams is one of the best physical pass catchers in college football last year, he should not be expected to beat a linebacker coming right for him and get the extra yard for the first down. If the ball is there sooner from Watson, he has a better chance, but it fails because of the slow delivery.

5. vs. South Carolina

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The final play we’ll look at is one against South Carolina. While most teams don’t often continue passing while up by 35 points in the second half, Clemson did, and it worked out for them here. This play shows Watson’s anticipation skills. He has a wheel route run out of the backfield by running back Corey Fuller, which was a common play for the team in 2016. Before Fuller even beats his man, Watson is preparing to throw to him. He uses a pump fake to move the linebacker, which gives the receiver a better chance to use his speed to win the route. Watson then drops a nice, arcing pass over the linebacker to Fuller, who is able to bring it down in the end zone and collecting the 6th touchdown for the Tigers on the day.

Conclusion

While Watson may have some knocks to his game, such a few questionable decisions and a slow velocity, he is the best quarterback in this year’s draft. While he should not be given full credit for beating Alabama in the National Championship game, he is a quarterback that puts his team in the best position to succeed and will not be making mistakes when the game is on the line. Watson may not be the first quarterback picked in this year’s draft, but he certainly has the tools to be the most successful of the bunch.